Season

Christmastide

Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Friday 25 April Mass and Social


Solemn High Mass, followed by a social in the hall under the church on Friday 25 April, Easter Friday.

Confessions from 7:15pm, Mass at 7.30pm.

St Mary Moorfields Catholic Church, Eldon Street, London EC2M 7LS

The social is for those aged 18-35. The Mass is, of course, open to everyone and all are welcome.

Food and drink will be provided at the social after Mass. If you can, please bring along a dish or a bottle to share. If you plan on bringing something please contact Tess at: teresanevard@hotmail.com

There is a Facebook event which you can use to invite others.


***JOIN THE CHOIR***

If you would like to join our choir then please contact John Simmonds at: johnds42@googlemail.com

We sing the Gregorian chant propers for each Mass we sing and often sing polyphony, depending on which singers are available each month. We are open to new people joining the choir, so if you are interested please contact John. We practise from 6.15pm before each Mass in the hall under the church.

Thursday, 13 March 2014

March Meeting



Our next Mass is coming up, on the 28th of March, at St. Mary Moorfields:



Homilies



Fr. de Malleray, the Ecclesiastical adviser to Juventutem International has very kindly sent us a link to an audio version of his homily which he gave on the 31st January at St. Mary Moorfields: http://www.gregorianbooks.com/father/adm/

Also The Rev'd Cyril Law, who is currently a deacon and a founding member of Juventutem Hong Kong has given us the text of the homily which he was going to deliver for us at February's Mass, which unfortunately did not take place. This text is the more old fashioned method, and can be seen below:


Stabat Mater dolorosa, juxta Crucem lacrimosa, dum pendebat Filium. 
There stands the Mother sorrowful, by the Cross most tearful, while hangeth the Son merciful. 

These heart-wrenching words are taken from the íncipit of the Marian sequence in homage of the brave Lady, Our Mother Most Holy, who partook in the redemptive suffering of Jesus in ways that only a Mother’s heart would know. One of the most vivid depiction of the momentous scene where her pain is at once seen not as pain as such but as a heroic poise that recognizes the immensity of Christ’s sacrifice would most certainly be the Pietá of Michaelangelo. There Our Lady is seen not as a woeful widow bereft and at a loss; rather, she holds her Son’s sacred body not just with her arms, but also with the same gaze that she used when picking up the Christ Child in Bethlehem. A Saviour she bore, a Saviour she now offers to all humanity by the sheer generous gesture of maternal solicitude and merciful care to the children won over from Satan by her own Son. 

I have had the fortune of deaconing at Pope Francis’ Mass on the Solemnity of the Mother God at the beginning of this year at St Peter’s. And before Mass, while waiting for the Holy Father to be vested at the back of the Basilica, there I was, face to face, behind the glass pane, I touched the very altar on which the Pietá was placed. It dawned on me immediately that the sculpture was not intended as a piece of art; rather it is a striking reminder of the inseverable tie between Our Lady’s Sorrow and Our Lord’s redemptive Passion on Calvary. Ad Jesum per Marian, true, to Jesus through Mary, but equally poignant is the realization that Christ came to us through Mary: ‘sic Christus qui vita est animarum nostrarum, occulté venit ad nos per Mariam. And so Christ who is the life of our souls, came in a hidden way to us through Mary’, teaches St Albert the Great. 

And among all the Marian devotees who profited most from this salutary realization, and through which climbed the ladder of sanctity so eminently, is the young Passionist Confessor, St Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows, whose memory we keep today. The Collect recalls his constant reflection of our Sweet Mother’s sorrows, and that it was through her that he was raised on high by the glory of holiness and miracles. Who is St Gabriel? He is fondly nicknamed the second Francis of Assisi, because Francis was his birth name, and that he was actually born in Assisi as well. Like the original Poverello of Assisi, young Francis was also a princeling of sorts, who relished the donning of elegant and trendy garments, cultivated refined manner of speech, and wouldn’t miss any fantastic show in town – a bit of a dandy we might say, bordering on being dainty but he was most certainly not prissy, or was he ever into unseemly revelries. He was deep down a good natured boy whose reverence for God and devotion to Our Lady still reigned supreme in his youthful soul. Francis’ lost his mother when he was only four, and since then, he always referred to his own mother with the other Mother, both in heaven, pointing often to the sky, saying, ‘Mamma’ e’ lassu’—mom is up there! This Marian sentiment marks his entire ethos, so much so that he made promises to enter religious life several times upon praying for the recovery of his sister who had fallen ill – but like many puerile fancy, he promptly forgot these promises. Yet Our Lady did not let this youngster off the hook so easily. During a solemn Marian procession, Francis heard Our Lady saying to him: ‘Francis, what are you doing here in this world? You are not made for this world. Follow your vocation’. And the rest is history – Francis became brother Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows who died a holy Passionist seminarian at the bright age of 24. Before he died, he specifically requested that his personal spiritual diaries be burnt, so that he would be spared the devil’s temptation of entertainig any thought that his death might be followed by the fame of holiness. A person who dies not wanting to be known as a saint – I think that is the epitome of a Marian soul, dying to oneself in utter humility and union with God, asking for no reward or acknowledgement save the sure guarantee of Our Lord’s mercy. 

St Gabriel was canonized by Pope Benedict XV in the year 19 hundred and 20, together with another saint of great repute, St Margaret Mary Alacoque, the promoter of the devotion to the Sacred Heart. As the Papal act of canonization reads: ‘in dissimilar times did they live, one who was already so greatly manifested by God in her lifetime, the other who passed unnoticed in his hidden cloisters, but both, like living holocausts, gave themselves all up to God so as to placate Divine Justice and to beseech mercy for all.’ 

One may get the impression that a young cloistered Passionist like St Gabriel cannot be but someone who always feel somehow down and gloomy in spirit with long sad faces. To the contrary, the locals to this very day still call him il Santo del sorriso – the Saint of the smile. I can appreciate how apt indeed is this description. I came to know a number of Abruzzezi, Italian youngsters from the Abruzzi region, where St Gabriel died. You may know it as the central province where the great earthquake of Aquila took place in 2009. Young Catholics there have a very strong devotion to St Gabriel. Legend goes that people used to chip away tiny bits of stone dust from his tomb and drink them with water and get miraculously cured. Students would come to pray at his shrine days on ends for success in studies. It is the fourth largest shrine in Italy, rivalled by that of Padre Pio. An italian seminarian here in London happens to come from the very town of the Shrine, the Isola del Gran Sasso. Yesterday he told me that, thanks to the intercession of St Gabriel, a couple years ago he recovered from a near depression because of failure in studies and at the end he managed to get a grip of himself and graduated from university with flying colours in two months’ time. Not only that, he told me it was St Gabriel who saved his life from a head-on motorbike accident that threw him and his companion all the way to the other side of the colliding vehicle. He came out of the wreckage with only some scratches on his knee. As I saw him recounting these miraculous feats with such a pious smile, I then knew why St Gabriel is called il Santo del sorriso – the Saint of the smile. 

‘Do not love the world, or the things of the world. The world passes away, and the lust of it; but he who does the will of God abides for ever.’ Joyfully joined to the tears of Our Lady and guarded by her Maternal protection, St Gabriel, the second Francis of Assisi, was enabled to renounce worldly desires and to carry out the will of God to the tee: ‘go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.’ 

Do not underestimate the power of a Mother’s tears and what that can do to young people’s hearts. Mamma' e’ lassu’ – mom is up there! Ask her to fulfill your desire to be humble and holy, and follow through with your vocation.

Notices



The following may be of interest to our members, friends and followers:
The London Oratory
Call to Youth
Thursday 13 March FROM 7.30pm,
A Lenten Evening of Reflections and Prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament in the Little Oratory
 7:30 - 8:00 pm Talk about the Sacrament of Penance
8:00 - 9:00 pm Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament
8:20 - 8:30 pm Meditation
8:45 - 9:00 pm Rosary
9:00 - 9:15 pm Benediction
9:15 - 10:00 pm Refreshments afterwards in St Wilfrid’s Hall
These events are always well worth attending. 

Next, Juventutem International will be attending the Summorum Pontificum conference at Rome in October. Further details, and the possibility of funding will be forthcoming in the near future.

Thursday, 13 February 2014

Bursaries available for International Catholic Summer Symposium

The Latin Mass Society (LMS), who sponsor our monthly Masses, are offering two bursaries for people aged 18-35 to attend the Roman Forum summer symposium in northern Italy this summer.

Since 1993, the Roman Forum has used a ten day Summer Symposium in Gardone Riviera, on Lake Garda, in northern Italy, to introduce participants to a full sense of the Catholic life. These explore the historical development and character of Christian Civilization. On the literary, musical, and artistic plane, the Symposia offer an environment in which writers, singers, instrumentalists, painters and sculptors may practice their art, teach, write, perform, and exhibit their work. In the active sphere, they provide a forum for contact and strategy planning between Catholics and Catholic organizations in the United States and those in Europe. Spiritually, the Symposia are built upon use of the local parish church of San Nicolò for daily, approved celebration of the Traditional Mass.

Finally, all of these activities are conducted in a truly Catholic atmosphere of conviviality and joy in life.

Accommodation and lectures are at the Locanda Agli Angeli. Rooms are mostly doubles, with bath. A limited number of singles is available. The Locanda is located in Gardone Sopra, a ten minute walk from the lakefront. Gardone is within easy traveling distance of Verona, Venice, Trent, Brescia, Milan, Ravenna, Pavia and Padua. In years past, participants have rented cars to tour the area, taken boat trips on the lake and attended the opera in Verona. The region offers opportunities for swimming, hiking, biking, boating and scenic walks. The lectures are scheduled in such a way as to allow time for recreation and sightseeing.

The full cost for the eleven days is Euro 2100 (approx = £2000). The LMS will pay £500 each towards that cost for two people. They have spoken to the organisers and they have said that, for the two sponsored people, they will further reduce the price, so they won’t have to pay £1500, but less than that. We don’t know how much less that will be at this stage, but if anyone is seriously interested in going, they should contact Mike Lord at the LMS office and he’ll give you more info. The details of the event are on the LMS website here: http://www.lms.org.uk/news-and-events/roman-forum

Contact details for the LMS office are:

The Latin Mass Society
11 - 13 Macklin Street
London WC2B 5NH

E-mail: info@lms.org.uk

Telephone: (+44) (0)20 7404 7284

Sunday, 9 February 2014

Friday 28 January Mass and Social


Solemn High Mass, followed by a social in the hall under the church on Friday 28 February.

Confessions from 7:15pm, Mass at 7.30pm.

St Mary Moorfields Catholic Church, Eldon Street, London EC2M 7LS

The social is for those aged 18-35. The Mass is, of course, open to everyone and all are welcome.

Food and drink will be provided at the social after Mass. If you can, please bring along a dish or a bottle to share.

There is a Facebook event page which can be used to invite others.

Saturday, 21 December 2013

Friday 31 January Mass and Social


Solemn High Mass for the feast of Saint John Bosco, followed by a social in the hall under the church on Friday 31 January.

Confessions from 7:15pm, Mass at 7.30pm.

St Mary Moorfields Catholic Church, Eldon Street, London EC2M 7LS

The social is for those aged 18-35. The Mass is, of course, open to everyone and all are welcome.

St John Bosco, 'the Father and Teacher of Youth', is one of the patron saints of the International Juventutem Federation, so his feast day is of especial significance for Juventutem London.

Food and drink will be provided at the social after Mass. If you can, please bring along a dish or a bottle to share.

There is a Facebook event page which can be used to invite others.